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WSJ Reports that Small Business Lenders are tightening standards in response to current economic uncertainty.

In today’s challenging economic environment a lifeline for small businesses may be harder to access — high interest rate small business loans. According to a report in the Wall Street Journal from March 28, 2020, “banks and financial-technology firms are starting to toughen their approval standards for new loans to consumers and small businesses. That means many people could find it hard to get credit just when they most need it, as the novel coronavirus pandemic puts thousands out of work.” https://www.wsj.com/articles/people-need-loans-as-coronavirus-spreads-lenders-are-making-them-tougher-to-get-11585357440?shareToken=stc8b569a61bc24802a8132278b06cf715 Read More
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SBRA's Debt Ceiling Increased to $7.5 million - More Businesses and Individuals will Qualify

The massive economic stimulus plan circulating in Congress right now will permit more businesses or individuals to take advantage of Subchapter 5 of the Bankruptcy Code (which FactorLaw has analyzed in prior posts) by increasing the debt cap from $2,700,000 to $7,500,000. The 880 page Senate Bill (the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act’’ or the ‘‘CARES Act’’) was unanimously approved by the Senate last night and will now go to the House. Reports are that the legislation will be approved by the House and signed by the President today or soon thereafter. If enacted without further change, the legislation will expand SBRA’s expedited processes to more businesses and individuals engaged in business by substantially increasing the debt cap. For cases filed within the next year, the SBRA will be available to debtors that have less than $7,500,000 of aggregate noncontingent liquidated, secured and unsecured debts. Read More
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FactorLaw's Summary and Analysis of the Small Business Reorganization Act

1. THE SUBCHAPTER 5 ELECTION. Chapter 11 now contains a “Subchapter 5” which applies only to “small business debtors” that make a so-called “Subchapter 5” election. See 11 U.S.C. §§ 1181-1195. Absent such an election, the small business case will be administered under the existing small business provisions of Chapter 11. Although the 2005 BAPCPA amendments to the Bankruptcy Code streamlined the Chapter 11 process for small business debtors (i.e., a plan has to be confirmed within 300 days), the process was still viewed as too onerous and expensive for those that qualified. Subchapter 5 provides small business debtors the option of using a new law designed to make the chapter 11 process faster and cheaper, including the process for selling a distressed business under a plan. It brings to Small Business Cases under Chapter 11 features previously available only in Chapter 12 or 13 cases. SBRA also reshuffles the leverage between debtors and creditors and tries to promote consensual outcomes. 2. THE INTERIM BANKRUPTCY RULES. Interim amendments to the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure also have been promulgated to guide cases where the debtor has made the Subchapter 5 election. The interim bankruptcy rules, including Interim Bankruptcy Rule 1020, implement the SBRA. New forms also may be forthcoming. 3. MAKING THE ELECTION. The Subchapter 5 election must be made on the petition for relief for voluntary cases or within 14 days after the order for relief in involuntary cases. Although the Subchapter 5 election is made when the bankruptcy petition is filed, Rule 1020(b) suggests the petition can be amended to make the Subchapter 5 designation after the filing. Doing so may not be advisable, however, because a delayed election may cause key deadlines to be missed. Another potential issue involves the retroactive application of the SBRA to cases pending before its effective date. 4. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA. Subchapter 5 cases are available to any entity or individual engaged in commercial or business activity with aggregate and liquidated debts of not more than $2,725,625, of which more than 50% is commercial or business debt. The new law helps clarify eligibility. More than 50% of the debt has to be commercial or business. In view of SBRA’s changes to the absolute priority rule, inter alia, individual chapter 11 debtors with primarily business debts should consider whether they can make the Subchapter 5 election. The eligibility requirements to be a small business debtor have been modified insofar as more than 50% of the debt now must be from the commercial or business activities of the debtor and the exclusion for single asset real estate debtors has been clarified. 5. CRAMDOWN VS. CONSENSUAL PLANS: SBRA differentiates between confirmation under §1191(a) and 1191(b). Section 1191(a) deals with a plan that is accepted by all classes of claims – i.e., a consensual plan. Section 1191(b) addresses a “cramdown plan.” As discussed herein, certain SBRA provisions apply, or do not apply, depending upon whether the plan is consensual or not. Existing law differentiates between a consensual plan and a cramdown. However, the requirements to confirm a cramdown plan are essentially the same as the requirements for a consensual plan, other than the absolute priority rule. The SBRA eases the burdens for confirming a cramdown plan and thus provides debtors with more leverage to negotiate concessions from creditors. Conversely, debtors fare better under SBRA if they are able to negotiate a consensual plan. As discussed herein, the SBRA tries to foster consensual plans. 6. NO ABSOLUTE PRIORITY RULE. Like in Chapter 13, the absolute priority rule does not apply with respect to classes of unsecured creditors when the debtor makes the Subchapter 5 election. Thus, the owners of the business can retain their ownership interest even if unsecured claims are not paid in full. Similarly, an individual debtor can retain property even if they do not pay unsecured creditors in full. Secured creditors, on the other hand, still must be paid in accordance with §1129, but like before, their claim can be bifurcated into a secured and unsecured portion. Also, secured creditors can still make the §1111(b) election. Prior to SBRA, the owners of a small business debtor could not retain their ownership interests unless all creditors, including unsecured creditors, were paid in full. Similarly, an individual that qualified as a small business debtor could not retain any property absent payment in full of all creditors. Paying creditors in full prior to allocating value to equity was codified in the “fair and equitable” test of §1129(b), which also codified the absolute priority rule. The absolute priority rule is a long-standing requirement of chapter 11 and in the past could be a strong impediment to the confirmation of a plan. Under SBRA, to be “fair and equitable” as to unsecured creditors, the small business debtor n… Read More
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Governor of New York Limits Power of Merchant Cash Advance Lenders to Use Confessions of Judgment

As a follow-up to our series of articles on the use of Merchant Cash Advances (see here, here, and here), we learned today that New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a bill last week aimed at preventing predatory lenders from using the state’s court system to seize the assets of small businesses nationwide. According to Bloomberg, “the new law prohibits use of confessions of judgment against individuals and businesses located outside of the state.” As we learn more about this new legislation (as well as the efforts in Congress to limit confessions of judgment), we will update our postings. If you would like more information regarding bankruptcy filings and would like to speak to one of our experienced attorneys, please call (312) 878-6976 or fill out a contact form here. Read More
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Small Business Reorganization Act Enacted

As discussed in a previous post, on Friday, the Small Business Reorganization Act was signed into law and will take effect in 180 days. The new law, which FactorLaw will further summarize in future blog posts, adds a new subchapter to the Bankruptcy Code that is designed to make the process less expensive and more feasible for small businesses (defined as persons engaged in a commercial or business activity with aggregate and noncontingent debts of less than $2,725,625). The American Bankruptcy Institute indicates that some have estimated that about half the chapter 11 cases filed today could qualify for treatment under this new law. Stay tuned as we continue to monitor these changes. If you would like to speak to one of our experienced attorneys regarding your business, please call (312) 878-6976 or fill out a contact form here. Read More
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Consumer Debt Rising

According to an article appearing today on the website for the American Bankruptcy Institute, the American middle class is falling deeper into debt to maintain a middle-class lifestyle. The ABI article is based upon a Wall Street Journal analysis. According to the ABI and WSJ: “Incomes have been largely stagnant for two decades, despite a recent uptick. Filling the gap between earning and spending is an explosion of finance into nearly every corner of the consumer economy. Consumer debt, not counting mortgages, has climbed to $4 trillion — higher than it has ever been even after adjusting for inflation. Mortgage debt slid after the financial crisis a decade ago but is rebounding. Student debt totaled about $1.5 trillion last year, exceeding all other forms of consumer debt except mortgages. Auto debt is up nearly 40 percent adjusting for inflation in the last decade to $1.3 trillion. And the average loan for new cars is up an inflation-adjusted 11 percent in a decade, to $32,187, according to an analysis of data from credit-reporting firm Experian. Unsecured personal loans are back in vogue, the result of competition between technology-savvy lenders and big banks for borrowers and loan volume. The debt surge is partly by design, a byproduct of low borrowing costs the Federal Reserve engineered after the financial crisis to get the economy moving. It has reshaped both borrowers and lenders. Consumers increasingly need it, companies increasingly can’t sell their goods without it, and the economy, which counts on consumer spending for more than two-thirds of GDP, would struggle without a plentiful supply of credit.” Read More
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Podcast - Panel for Consumer Commission discusses recommendations on BAPCPA's Credit Counseling requirement

Members of ABI’s Commission on Consumer Bankruptcy discuss the recommendations in the Final Report focused on the Code’s credit counseling and financial management course requirements, and asks the question: do the new provisions make a financial clean-slate more challenging for debtors? The round-table discussion podcast features FactorLaw’s Consumer Bankruptcy expert Ariane Holtschlag, and can be accessed below, or you can click here to go to the ABI article directly. In addition, click here to download a copy of the Final Report of the ABI Commission on Consumer Bankruptcy. Read More
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Mack Industries - Agenda for Omnibus Hearing on July 17, 2019

We just posted a copy of the agenda for the upcoming Omnibus Hearing on the Mack Industries avoidance actions filed by our office. The next hearing will take place on July 17, 2019. Click here for to go to our Mack Industries page. Read More
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Categories: News

Notable parallels between the 2008-2009 financial crisis and today's high-risk alternative lending sector

This week, the American Bankruptcy Institute posted an article (which is reprinted below) identifying a growing trend that may impact a large sector of the economy: alternative lenders making risky loans. As many know, the 2008-2009 meltdown ensnared a lot of big and established financial institutions and if not for substantial government intervention the fallout would have been worse and perhaps longer-lasting. For purposes of context, a Wikipedia report states that the “financial crisis of 2007–2008, also known as the global financial crisis and the 2008 financial crisis, is considered by many economists to have been the most serious financial crisis since the Great Depression of the 1930. It began in 2007 with a crisis in the subprime mortgage market in the United States, and developed into a full-blown international banking crisis with the collapse of the investment bank Lehman Brothers on September 15, 2008. Excessive risk-taking by banks such as Lehman Brothers helped to magnify the financial impact globally. Massive bail-outs of financial institutions and other palliative monetary and fiscal policies were employed to prevent a possible collapse of the world financial system. The crisis was nonetheless followed by a global economic downturn, the Great Recession. The European debt crisis, a crisis in the banking system of the European countries using the euro, followed later. In 2010, the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act was enacted in the US following the crisis to “promote the financial stability of the United States”. The Basel III capital and liquidity standards were adopted by countries around the world.” If one juxtaposes the above summary of the 2008-2009 crisis with the ABI’s summary of the current high-risk lending environment (see below), there are notable parallels that should make insolvency professionals take note. Of particular relevance is the current tendency of less regulated institutions to engage in risky transactions (some of which are not unlike the subprime mortgages (see above) that helped precipitate the 2008-2009 meltdown). According to the ABI: “A decade after reckless home lending nearly destroyed the financial system, the business of making risky loans is back, the New York Times reported on Tuesday. This time, the money is bypassing the traditional, and heavily regulated, banking system and flowing through a growing network of businesses that have stepped in to provide loans to parts of the economy that banks abandoned after 2008. With almost $15 trillion in assets, the shadow-banking sector in the U.S. is roughly the same size as the entire banking system of Britain, the world’s fifth-largest economy. In certain areas — including mortgages, auto lending and some business loans — shadow banks have eclipsed traditional banks, which have spent much of the last decade pulling back on lending in the face of stricter regulatory standards aimed at keeping them out of trouble. But new problems arise when the industry depends on lenders that compete aggressively, operate with less of a cushion against losses and have fewer regulations to keep them from taking on too much risk. Recently, a chorus of industry officials and policymakers — including Federal Reserve Chair Jerome H. Powell — have started to signal that they’re watching the growth of riskier lending by these nonbanks. “We decided to regulate the banks, hoping for a more stable financial system, which doesn’t take as many risks,” said Amit Seru, a professor of finance at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. “Where the banks retreated, shadow banks stepped in.” Lately, that lending is coming from companies like Quicken Loans, loanDepot and Caliber Home Loans. Between 2009 and 2018, the share of mortgage loans made by these businesses and others like them soared from 9 percent to more than 52 percent, according to Inside Mortgage Finance. While they don’t have a nationwide regulator that ensures safety and soundness like banks do, non-banks say that they are monitored by a range of government entities, from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to state regulators.” Read More
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FactorLaw featured in Leading Lawyers Magazine, May 2019

An excerpt: “We are very much a family business, like many of the clients we are representing,” Factor says. “Providing top-notch service to our clients is the glue that holds us together. They’re getting the same service they would get at a major firm, but at a more affordable price, including flexible fee structures and more personalized attention.” To access the complete article, click the link below. Download Read More
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